SAFETY EQUIPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS

There is a variety of equipment that can improve safety in the home for seniors.

Many people I have worked with in the past have not had any idea of all the many resources that are available to help improve safety. The following is a list of common equipment that patients I have worked with in the past have found extremely helpful. This equipment is typically not covered by insurance, but can help someone with daily activities, and improve safety. Always check with your personal clinician if you have any questions.

General guidelines to consider when purchasing equipment.

Make sure you read the details regarding height, weight, and size. Consider where you would use the equipment, and the space availability. Make sure it will work with your existing equipment, furniture. etc. It is always best to have a clinician help you figure out what is appropriate for your exact needs and situation, especially if you or your loved one is weak or has a history of falls.

Clinicians may be able to use this information for patient education, and families/seniors can use this as a guide, or to review with their clinician.

Bed rail to assist getting in and out of bed: (affiliate link)

Step stool with handle for getting in and out of a tall bed:(affiliate link)

 

 

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Reacher – 2 pack- with magnetic grip and clip for walker, to assist with dressing and picking up items:

(affiliate link)

 

 

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Elastic shoe ties (cheaper than buying a new pair of velcro shoes):(affiliate link)

 

 

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Car transfer handle assist:(affiliate link)

 

 

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Tennis balls for walker:

(affiliate link)

 

 

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Basket for walker to keep hands free and improve safety:

(affiliate link)

 

 

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Tips for a cane: (don’t forget to check them occasionally, and especially if someone loans you their equipment; and order with caution, as they do come in a few different sizes)

(affiliate link)

 

 

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Elevated toilet seat with arms for support: make sure you purchase appropriate for body weight and width of toileting area. You need to be able to stand and turn to sit for this one.

(affiliate link)

 

 

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Elevated toilet seat for a smaller space:

(affiliate link)

 

 

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There are several other elevated toilet seat options. You may benefit from having a clinician guide your choice. Occasionally they may be covered by insurance if a person is extremely weak or unsafe.

A Physical or Occupational Therapist can provide excellent information and feedback for your home equipment.

 

Walking and mobility devices are usually covered by insurance. Bath benches typically are not. When it comes to bath benches, wall rail placements, and devices for mobility (walker, cane, wheelchair, etc) there are so many variables, that it is really important to get professional input.

A few things to consider are: the set up of your home and rooms the equipment would need to be used in, the measurement of the space available, and the person’s body weight, height, and/or seat width.

What equipment have you found to be helpful in the home for seniors?

 

 

 

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